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Introduction to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

Friday September 13th & Saturday September 14th, 2019

Dates:

Friday September 13th & Saturday September 14th, 2019

Times: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Location:

Sorenson Legacy Foundation Center for Clinical Excellence

Room 150

Utah State University, Logan, UT

Pricing:

Professionals
Full Workshop $237 Full Workshop (Saturday lunch included) Register Here
Friday Only $135 Friday, Sep. 13, 2019 only Register Here
Saturday Only $142 Saturday, Sep. 14, 2019 only (lunch included) Register Here
Students
Full Workshop $77 Full Workshop (Saturday lunch included) Register Here
Friday Only $40 Friday, Sep. 13, 2019 only Register Here
Saturday Only $47 Saturday, Sep. 14, 2019 only (lunch included) Register Here

Registration accepted until 8/30.

Workshop Details:

Day 1: An Introduction to ACT

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is an innovative type of psychotherapy that falls within the cognitive behavioral tradition. ACT is a unified treatment model that has strong support for specific disorders such as chronic pain, depression, substance use, and anxiety disorders. ACT works under the assumption that people are not broken and our thinking patterns and emotions are both logical and appropriate. The problem lies in the way we attempt to control and regulate these inner experiences. ACT assumes that most psychological disorders—or things that people struggle with—are at least partially the result of our attempts to regulate our thoughts and feelings and not the thoughts and feelings themselves.

ACT teaches clients how to:
• Notice problematic thoughts and feelings, see them for what they are (just thoughts and feelings)
• Make room for them in their lives (“acceptance”)
• Move in directions that are meaningful to them
• Get to a place in their lives where inner experiences do not control them
• Live a life that is guided by both meaning and purpose

Day 1 Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss the philosophy and theory behind ACT
  • Describe the basic research that informs ACT
  • Describe the most recent research on ACT
  • List the psychological processes targeted in ACT
  • Explain the psychological processes targeted in ACT
  • Utilize at least one key ACT exercise in a therapeutic context

Day 2: Experiential ACT Workshop

To really learn how to kick a ball it is necessary to practice kicking; lectures on the topic can only get one so far. The best way to see what ACT is really like is to participate in it. During this one-day experiential workshop, participants will get to experience an abbreviated version of the entire ACT treatment protocol. Participants will be asked to select a relatively minor struggle in their lives (for example: anxiety about sports, struggles at work or school, uncertainties about careers, or struggles in friendships) and practice working through these issues using ACT techniques. Participants will be given opportunities to share their reactions to the exercises. This will give participants firsthand experience and insight into the ACT treatment model. It will teach them the ACT tune that they would otherwise never get to hear. Compared to day 1, there will be much less discussion of why ACT is done the way it is done and much more time spent seeing how it is done. This workshop is for individuals who want a deeper understanding of ACT.

Day 2 Learning Objectives:

  • List the psychological processes targeted in ACT
  • Explain the psychological processes targeted in ACT
  • Apply ACT principles in a therapeutic context
  • Utilize at least one ACT exercise in a therapeutic context
  • List resources for further information on ACT

Presenter Bio:

Michael P. Twohig, Ph.D. is a professor in the Department of Psychology at Utah State University and a peer-reviewed ACT trainer. He received his doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Nevada, Reno while working with Dr. Steven Hayes. Dr. Twohig has published over 100 scholarly works and is the author of two books. Dr. Twohig’s research has been funded by multiple sources and focuses on the mechanisms of action of behavioral therapies including Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Cognitive Behavior Therapy, and exposure therapies. He works with many psychological disorders, currently focusing on the treatment of anxiety disorders, especially Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and OC-spectrum disorders.

Clarissa W. Ong, M.S. is a fifth-year doctoral student in the Clinical/Counseling Psychology program at Utah State University. Her research interests include developing and testing process-based cognitive-behavioral therapies for anxiety and obsessive-compulsive related concerns, evaluating the psychometric quality of assessment tools, and examining processes of change and other variables that influence treatment response with the aim of increasing availability and accessibility of effective psychological interventions.

Questions?

Please contact jen.barney4@aggiemail.usu.edu or call our office at (435) 797-8303 for more information.